Organizers of the Monaco Grand Prix insist the race will retain a place in the F1 calendar | Formula One

Organizers of the Monaco Grand Prix have said the race remains on the Formula 1 calendar as the sport seeks to host new meetings. The road circuit contract expires this year, but the president of the Monaco Automobile Club, Michel Boeri, is convinced that a new agreement will be agreed.

Monte Carlo hosted its first F1 race in the opening year of the series in 1950 and became world-renowned for its track track on the city’s winding roads. However, the course is no longer suitable for modern F1 cars and the race is often an accident-free procession.

In the past, such was the prestige of the event, the race was not required to pay a guest fee, an agreement reached by the new owners of F1, Liberty Media. F1 has recently concluded a deal to make a run in Las Vegas next year and expects to add one in Kyalami in South Africa soon. With a limited season of 24 races, there is increasing pressure on the meetings to justify their position. F1 general manager Stefano Domenicali warned that the “pedigree” of a race would not guarantee its place and that some events could be shot on and off the calendar.

With this year’s race scheduled for May 29, Boeri has claimed that Monaco will retain its place. Speaking to racing marshals this week, he said: “It was implied that the required fares were too excessive for Monaco and that the Grand Prix would no longer be held. It is false. We are still in discussions with them and must now seal the agreement. with a contract.

“I can guarantee that the Grand Prix will continue outside of 2022. I don’t know if it will be a three- or five-year contract, but that’s a saying.”

Meanwhile, the FIA ​​has reacted to drivers’ criticism of the speed of the Aston Martin safety car at the Australian Grand Prix. The reigning champion, Max Verstappen, was open in his disapproval, noting that the pilots could not keep the temperature of the tires behind. “The security car was driving so slow, it was like a turtle. Incredible,” he said. “It’s pretty terrible the way we’re driving behind the security car at the moment.”

The other conductors joined in their complaints, albeit in a lighter tone. George Russell of Mercedes said he believed the Mercedes safety car was five seconds per lap faster, at which the winner of the race, Charles Leclerc, noted that a Ferrari version would be even faster.

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    The FIA ​​responded on Thursday, issuing a statement, stressing that it was not a performance issue with the Aston Martin. “The primary function of the security vehicle is not speed, but the safety of drivers, marshals and officials,” they said. “The speed of the safety car is therefore generally dictated by race control, and not limited by the capabilities of the safety vehicles.”

    The Haas team, which abandoned its title holder of the Russian company Uralkali and pilot Nikita Mazepin after the invasion of Ukraine, responded to his request for a return of payment with a direct refusal and a counterclaim. The team is understood to have rejected Uralkali’s claim for $ 13m (£ 9.95m) and instead demanded compensation of $ 8.6m for “loss of profits”.

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